PP meets Seany P

PP: PP: Congratulations Sean on your recent EPA Singles success, how does it feel to be the national champion?
SP: I’m chuffed especially after coming close in recent years I thought it was never going to happen.
PP: You got off to a bad start, actually losing your first morning league game to Steve Brown.  How did it affect you and how were you able to progress as you had a tough group?
SP: Strangely it helped. I went into the first game with the wrong attitude. I was playing a good player but I took the terrain for granted and thought it was easier to point on than it actually was. I went into the next games with no fear, relaxed and sped up my game a bit to take away any over thinking and it just clicked
PP: That last match was very important against Herve Bavazzano, did you feel much pressure going into it?
SP: Very relaxed actually, I had just beaten Ross Jones to 3 so I knew I was back in the groove.
PP: So, you made it to the knock out stage, who did you face on your way to the final?
SP: After the group games I knew I had a decent chance as I was playing well. I was drawn against David Plumhoff in the first round, as per usual, but this time it was different, he played exceptionally good boule but, unfortunately for him so did I! I was then to face Dag Nygaard, he pointed very well and went into an early lead but then I found my pointing consistency and, along with some scoot shooting carreaux, was able to win to 6. I was then up against Stephen Meadowcroft in the quarters. It was similar to the last game, tight up until about 5 all, then suddenly I took a commanding lead. He’s a difficult opponent as he points well. In the semis I had the long shooter supremo Theo Diecket. I think he was tired and feeling the hot weather and his pointing went right off as I won that Comfortably to 5.
PP: How did you react to the draw?
SP: Everyone reacts to a draw. I’m very analytical in sport, I analyse my play, form and my opponents strengths and weaknesses. If people say they don’t care or concentrate on who they are playing next, well, they either have the mentality of a warrior or they are fibbing! I personally think it’s good to analyse, it keeps you concentrated.
PP: The final was against Ashley Jamieson,  a good friend of yours and a man who was playing his best boule for a long time. How did the Final go?
SP: The final was a tense affair. It was a decent standard but not amazing, very nip and tuck all the way. I did have a few butterflies when it was 11-10 but thankfully Ash took three boules to beat my first point and I ended with a carreau for game, which was a nice way to win it. Ash is a top player and a top guy.
PP: Now that you are Champion you can reflect on the draw and run in you had. Where do you feel the defining match was and who was your toughest opponent(s) and why?
SP: I had many tough opponents on my way to success. I would have to say David Plumhoff played best against me, he only missed 2 boules out of about 16 in the whole match, and it was hard build a lead. Herve Bavazzano was also very strong  but ultimately Ash Jamieson gave me the most worries, hence it being a very tight encounter! I had a very tough morning league (Ross Jones, Herve Bavazzano & Steve Brown), all very good players and going through top amongst that group was probably my defining moment. I never want to play Steve Brown in singles again, he always beats me!
PP: Since your win you’ve come into some scrutiny with your style and methods when playing the Singles, how do you react to those comments?  Do you have any messages for those doubting your credentials?
SP: For me sport is all about winning. You play the terrain and use your brain to choose the best sho. I have enough self belief to not worry too much about what people think. People who know my game well know I can mix it with the top boule to boule shooters. I also think it can never be a bad thing to have a variety of shots to your game.
PP: Well, congratulations again, Sean, on your success, we at Positive Pétanque believe you are a worthy champion. Finally, what are your short term and long term ambitions?
SP: My ambition is simpl, to keep trying to win in every competition I play in. I’m back in love with the game and I hope this Singles win can further my success in the national qualifiers, where I am playing with fantastic people and players. Just like all players I’d love to play at the Men’s World Championships one day.
PP: Thanks Sean, you and Sammy Thatcher are both great and deserved Singles Champions this year.
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